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20130218
20130218
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
a change relative to the u.s.? >> there are going to be some challenges -- channels of communications. i do not expect best friends between america and united states but i expect the town to get better. it is in a terrible state. they have the highest inflation in latin america. they have food court -- of food shortages all over the place. that is why hugo chavez has come back to calm things down. they are in for a rough time. >> any guess on who the successor might be? >> his current vice-president is in the best position. hugo chavez designated him in december. he does not have his charisma, but he is in the strongest position right now. >> in other news, a former u.s. prosecutor house called for the international court to investigate war crimes in syria. he is working on an inquiry into the syrian conflict, reporting on human-rights violations of both sides. including the use of mass executions and the imprisonment of children. evidence has gathered more than 500 syrian refugees. people have been reported to be wounded in a clash at mines in south africa. it's they were wounded by rubber
in the u.s. ia, the united states information agency, and he wrote the screenplay for the memorial film about jfk, the man who fought a lot about american history. he disagreed with my approach from the get go. well before the controversies of bringing in john d.. he said every president has a right to a watering hole. there are all those who admires him who can go and speak and not have to worry about the judgment of history. if it is ahat's true private facility. but the minute you make it belic, i think it can't published--- cannot be governed by those rules. again, i don't think the public recognizes that it has a choice. if you go to the different presidential libraries, you'll find this among them are shrines and others are places of serious discussion. the harry truman, for example, is a place of serious discussion. the johnson library is redoing its museum. i haven't seen it yet, but i suspect it will be a place for serious discussion. and there are others that are not. i think the public needs to figure out what they want. " your office is and what -- >> your office is in what
against the apartheid in the u.s. complicity in helping to kind of prop up the government. eight days after 9/11, she joins harry belafonte and a number of civil rights activists to call for justice, not vengeance to decry any move to the war and insist that the united states work with an international law and in the international community to bring justice. so where do we go from here who? on the anniversary of the boycott last count, president obama had a picture of himself on the rosa parks thus setting in the rosa parks pos. as we know the post office will issue a stamp. she is as one of my colleagues put it the american version of the national st.. but her legacy asks much more about the statute. and if we are going to claim her legacy as president obama did last month, then we must realize what it asks of us. rosa parks courage was the ability to make an independent stand even though she and others had done that before and nothing had changed. even when she understood the harm to make those stands over and over throughout the course of her life, even when the civil rights moveme
of america put out a piece, talking about the u.s. celebrating president's day. it first became a federal holiday in 1879 to celebrate the february 22nd birthday of george washington, the first u.s. president. joe in maryland, democrat, hi. caller: my favorit would have to have been bill clinton. there are so many to choose from. i was very young. it was in high school at the time. he put into place a lot of laws that allow for people like me to go to college. beyond that, he was just incredibly involved in science necessarily see a lot of a a lot of presidents do now. host: from oklahoma, an independent caller. caller: my favorite president has to be lyndon johnson. look what he did for civil rights not only for americans but for everybody in this country. he fought through the garage of our southern states, and he got it through. -- fought through the brage of our southern states. lyndon johnson said, "when i sign these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for
, on tomorrow's show, former u.s. secretary of state madeline albright will join us onset. >> i thought we were going to have an awkward segue because andrew ross sorkin is over there. >> no, no. we're talking about madeline albright. there is andrew ross sorkin. he's coming up too. >>> coming up later this morning, former senior adviser to president obama, david axelrod. keep it here on "morning joe." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ i don't want any trouble. i don't want any trouble either. ♪ [ engine turns over ] [ siren wailing in distance ] you know you forgot to take your mask off, right? we should probably get out of here. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new beetle convertible. now every day is a top-down day. that's the power of german engineering. >>> all bundled up. that's good because it's cold outside. don't forget your mittens. >> you put that hat on. nobody put that hat on you. >> true. >> put it on. live with it. >> andrew ross sorkin is here. also, bob woodward when we come back. "morning joe" is going to start rocking. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain che
tomorrow, a look at the role of the business community in higher education. that is from the u.s. chamber of commerce in washington. among the speakers, the educational secretary in george w. bush's second term. > host: we take a look at how your taxpayer dollars are being spent. on this presidents day, we will focus on presidents and what sort of benefits they get after they leave office. let's begin with a history. when did taxpayers start paying for these benefits for presidents after they leave office? guest: the act was enacted in 1958. the idea occurred around 1912. andrew carnegie decided he wanted to use his foundation to pay about $25,000 a year in pensions to former presidents. the first former president that would have been able to use that $25,000 happened to be his friend taft. taft did not need the money. he was a professor at yale. he became the supreme court justice. he had to walk a delicate balance of telling his friend thanks but no thanks and decided not to accept it. andrew carnegie and never articulated why he wanted to pay the pension. members of congress thought it
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)